Increase NextCloud 13 Storage

NextCloud is one of the most popular ways for users to take control of their data again. Users can use NextCloud to manage their Contacts, Calendars, Files, and a number of other types of data with the available Apps. NextCloud is a fork of the original ownCloud, but advocates more of an emphasis on the communities needs.

NextCloud 13 uses the ZFS file system to manage storage, and it makes increasing storage incredibly easy. Previous versions of NextCloud required many steps of expanding, partitioning, extending, and resizing to increase storage. To increase NextCloud 13 storage is much simpler:

  1. Add new hard disk
  2. Scan for new hard disk
  3. Add new disk to the ZFS pool “ncdata”
  4. Verify ZFS pool “ncdata” size

Below are screenshots and a walkthrough, including sample output of the commands, to increase NextCloud 13 storage on an ESXi VM. You will need to either have console or SSH access to your NextCloud host as well as sudo access.

First, run df -Th to verify the “ncdata” size; in my environment it is 39G, as seen on line 8.

Add a new disk to the VM. Because NextCloud 13 uses ZFS pools, it is easier to increase your storage by adding new drives rather than expanding or extending existing drives. We are adding a 60 GB hard drive in our example.
ESXi New Hard Disk

After adding the drive, either reboot or scan for the new disk with the below command, replacing “host0” with the appropriate host number.

If you have many hosts like me, you can use the below bash script to just scan through them all.

After scanning or rebooting, run fdisk -l to view all the partitions, including the new one. In my environment, you will see that the 60G partition appears as “sdc” beginning on line 36 below. Note the partition for the next step.

Next, verify the current “ncdata” size using zpool list. You can also verify the partitions in the pool first using zpool status ncdata seen further below.

When you are ready, use the below command to add the new partition to the ZFS Pool. In our example, we are adding the partition “sdc” to the ZFS Pool “ncdata”.

Run zpool list again afterwards to verify the increased size.

As suggested above, you can use zpool status ncdata to verify the new partition has been added to the pool as well.